The Lilac Blewit: Lepista Sordida

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Lepista Sordida

Jsun from Mushroaming put me onto these little beauties, found in abundance in suburban lawns and parks over summer and into winter. They form clumps and fairy rings that can get huge, they seem to have a symbiotic relationship of some kind with the grass they grow with as it is tall, lush and green, growing faster where the mushrooms are.

The Atlas of living Australia list these as Lepista Sublilacina however recent DNA analysis found them to be L. Sordida an edible species from the northern hemisphere. Perhaps we have both species in Australia. Whatever the case the fact that they grow close to humans in lawns makes me think they are the introduced species.

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Lepista sordida, more typical colouring

These little Blewits are a pleasure to see, smell and taste. An amazing floral aroma with  great mushroomy flavor. Wild mushrooms should always be cooked before eating, these are good sauteed in butter with a pinch of salt. They grow well from stem butts and from a culture onto grain, I am experimenting with an outdoor patch using sugar cane mulch and grain spawn.

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Pink spore print of L. Sordida

Caps, stem and gills are a fairly uniform lilac colour that fades over time to become a washed out pink or even white with some brown around the edge and on the umbo as they age and are exposed to the sun. They have a pleasant floral odor when picked. The caps are small from 30 to around 100 mm across. Growing in soil with grass, or with wood chips in gardens but unlikely in native bush land. Pink spore print. The mycelium is also lilac!

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Hydrocybe Cheelii

Look alikes: There are a few Cortinarius Sp. that can be purple or lilac, they have rust brown spore print. Some Hygrocybe Sp. are lilac with a white spore print. Both species are more likely to be found in native bush and are not edible.

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Cortinarius Sp. Note the rust brown spores on the stem

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Lepista Sordida

Fungi are very efficient at collecting nutrients from their habitat, they can also pick up nasties like chemical fertilizer, heavy metals and herbicides. Its worth considering where your dinner is growing and what residue is in the immediate area that you may not want to consume. Roadsides and places where herbicides are used are not great places to pick mushrooms.

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